Emperor Penguin – Nature

There is a lot that we can learn from nature and it has examples of every kind. We have grown from being animals in nature to humans in society. There are certain things we have improvised during this journey of transition, but somethings we have lost in the course of time. Today we are confused about the feelings of love, care, morality, relationships and survival. We fight among our own kind and we end up frustrated in our relationships. Sometimes, when I see nature, I feel it has answers to all the questions we have. I am starting this new series of Nature, which has been inspired by my never ending passion to know about Nature and I will share various lessons I learnt from nature.

Emperor Penguin have always been my inspiration about survival, care and relationship. If you have seen some of the movies or videos of Penguin, you will know that penguins look and walk like tiny human beings. There are so many amazing facts about penguins, especially the emperor ones, but today I want to deal with the significant aspect of penguins in terms of relationship, care, love and survival.

LOVE AND RELATIONSHIP:

Emperor penguins are seriously monogamous. They have only one mate each year, and stay faithful to that mate.

A lone male gives an ecstatic display, where it stands still and places its head on its chest before inhaling and giving a courtship call for 1–2 seconds; it then moves around the colony and repeats the call. A male and female then stand face to face, with one extending its head and neck up and the other mirroring it; they both hold this posture for several minutes. Once in pairs, couples waddle around the colony together, with the female usually following the male. Before copulation, one bird bows deeply to its mate, its bill pointed close to the ground, and its mate then does the same.

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Picture Credits ©Australian Antarctic Division

CARE AND SURVIVAL :

They huddle together to escape wind and conserve warmth. Individuals take turns moving to the group’s protected and relatively toasty interior. Once a penguin has warmed a bit it will move to the perimeter of the group so that others can enjoy protection from the icy elements.

Emperor penguins spend the long winter on the open ice—and even breed during this harsh season. Females lay a single egg and then promptly leave it behind. They undertake an extended hunting trip that lasts some two months! Depending on the extent of the ice pack, females may need to travel some 50 miles (80 kilometers) just to reach the open ocean, where they will feed on fish, squid, and krill. At sea, emperor penguins can dive to 1,850 feet (565 meters)—deeper than any other bird—and stay under for more than 20 minutes.

Male emperors keep the newly laid eggs warm, but they do not sit on them, as many other birds do. Males stand and protect their eggs from the elements by balancing them on their feet and covering them with feathered skin known as a brood pouch. During this two-month bout of babysitting the males eat nothing and are at the mercy of the Antarctic elements.

When female penguins return to the breeding site, they bring a belly full of food that they regurgitate for the newly hatched chicks. Meanwhile, their duty done, male emperors take to the sea in search of food for themselves.

Mothers care for their young chicks and protect them with the warmth of their own brood pouches. Outside of this warm cocoon, a chick could die in just a few minutes. In December, Antarctic summer, the pack ice begins to break up and open water appears near the breeding site, just as young emperor penguins are ready to swim and fish on their own.

I believe we have a lot to learn from the courtship, relationship, child care, love and survival strategies of Emperor Penguin.

Check the Happy Feet 2 Trailer here ©WarnerBros

Check the Emperor Penguin Show by ©BBC